Дайджест
21 Января 2010 года

GLASNOST DEFENSE FOUNDATION DIGEST No. 461


TOPIC OF THE WEEK
Global erosion of freedom

RUSSIA
1. Republic of Karelia. Newspaper wins six court hearings concerning one and the same publication
2. Republic of Dagestan. Justice Ministry demands an end to violations of journalists’ rights
3. Republic of Dagestan. FSB officers make reporter erase photo pictures
4. Krasnodar Territory. Who’s the slyest one in Sochi?
5. Republic of Karelia. Finance minister at law with two newspapers
6. Vladivostok. Newspaper accused of extremism

BELARUS

Police search journalist’s apartment

GLASNOST DEFENSE FOUNDATION
Some statistics cited

OUR PUBLICATIONS
1. Press Day in Russia
2. Festival with a taste of bitterness

OUR PARTNERS

1. Journalists in Bryansk help raise money for disabled kid
2. Winners of journalistic competition honored in Chita

DIGEST MAIL




TOPIC OF THE WEEK

Global erosion of freedom

On December 12, Freedom House published its annual report on the status of political rights and civil liberties the world over. This year’s document is titled “Freedom in the World 2010: Global Erosion of Freedom”.

“In a year marked by intensified repression against human rights defenders and civic activists, declines for freedom were registered in 40 countries in Africa, Latin America, the Middle East, and the former Soviet Union, representing 20 percent of the world’s total polities. Authoritarian states including Iran, Russia, Venezuela, and Vietnam became more repressive. Declines in freedom also occurred in countries that had registered positive trends in previous years, including Bahrain, Jordan, Kenya, and Kyrgyzstan,” the report says pointing out that Kyrgyzstan was downgraded from the “Partly Free” to the “Not Free” group of countries which also includes Belarus, Tajikistan, Kazakhstan and Russia – because of electoral law violations, religious freedom restrictions, state control over the interpretation of history, and killings of civic activists and journalists. Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan are in the “Worst of the Worst” group together with Burma, Equatorial Guinea, Eritrea, Libya, North Korea, Somalia, Sudan and Tibet.

“This year’s findings reflect the growing pressures on journalists and news media, restrictions on freedom of association, and repression aimed at civic activists engaged in promoting political reform and respect for human rights,” the report says.

According to the Freedom House experts, 47 countries were “not free” in 2009, 58 were “partly free”, and 89 countries, most of them in Western Europe and North America, were “free”.




RUSSIA

1. Republic of Karelia. Newspaper wins six court hearings concerning one and the same publication


By Anatoly Tsygankov,
GDF staff correspondent in North-Western Federal District

The newspaper Kondopozhsky Listok has won defending against legal claims lodged last year by six candidates for seats on the Kondopoga District Council in the wake of an election-related publication that allegedly damaged their honor and dignity. The plaintiffs wanted an official refutation and a total of RUR 143,000 in moral damage compensation. The peculiarity of the situation was that the publication had not mentioned a single name, only stating that workers of the local pulp-and-paper plant had been nominated for Council seats by the score (which fact was not questioned in court because that was perfectly true).

The court, having considered the first two claims, found that the disputed phrases in the newspaper story did not damage anyone’s honor or dignity and, which was the most important thing, they were not addressed to anyone in person. Therefore, both claims were turned down. Understanding the senselessness of further litigation, the two loser candidates refrained from challenging the court decision before a higher-standing judicial authority, although according to editor Sergey Kononov, they contacted him via some middlemen threatening him with protracted proceedings and proposing an amicable settlement – i.e., the publishing of a refutation. The editor declined to do so, and that signaled the end of the conflict. The other four plaintiffs simply did not attend the hearings and the court left their legal claims unconsidered. 


2. Republic of Dagestan. Justice Ministry demands an end to violations of journalists’ rights

According to Magomed Magomedov, a reporter for the Dagestan-based newspaper Chernovik, the republic’s department of the RF Justice Ministry has urged the regional branch of the United Russia Party (URP) not to breach the law and provide information about members of its Political Council. Such information not being a state secret, withholding it is against the RF Media Law and Constitution.

Earlier, the leaders of the Dagestani branch of URP repeatedly declined to provide the list of its Political Council members at Chernovik’s request. Council head Ibragim Ibragimov insisted that those data were for internal use only and not subject to disclosure. Even recommendations of the party’s federal leadership were ignored.

After the newspaper complained to the law enforcers, Dagestan’s Justice Ministry sent the URP leaders an official statement pointing out that I. Ibragimov was in breach of the provisions of the RF Constitution, the Law on Political Parties, the Media Law and the URP Charter.

On New Year’s eve Chernovik received an official reply signed by A. Guseinayev, head of the republic’s branch of the Justice Ministry, saying that “in line with Article 40 of the Media Law, access to information can only be denied if such information contains data constituting state, commercial or other secrets specially protected under the law. Since the requested information does not fall under the category of secrets, denying access thereto is unlawful.” The minister asked I. Ibragimov to provide the list of Political Council members to Chernovik journalists at their request.


3. Republic of Dagestan. FSB officers make reporter erase photo pictures

By Dmitry Florin,
GDF staff correspondent in Central Federal District

Newspaper Chernovik’s photo reporter Ruslan Alibekov was assigned on January 13 to take pictures of KAMAZ trucks with concrete slabs being unloaded to block off the street outside the FSB headquarters in Makhachkala. Having taken a number of pictures, he was told by a group of FSB officers to erase them.

“I told the officers I had only photographed the trucks, not the FSB headquarters, but they told me to erase the images anyway,” Alibekov says.

According to him, FSB men detained him twice, and each time the journalist offered them to take his camera and empty the memory stick themselves, but they would refuse to, telling him to do that of his own free will. Actually, Alibekov maintains security officers’ requests for the images to be erased were senseless because those could easily be restored on the stick. The officers were polite but insistent, and two more were standing nearby, submachine-guns in hand. “What did I have to do but obey? I will restore the photo pictures anyway, but I can’t understand what the whole thing was needed for in the first place,” R. Alibekov says.


4. Krasnodar Territory. Who’s the slyest one in Sochi?

By Victoria Tashmatova,
GDF staff correspondent in Southern Federal District

In July 2006 several media published one and the same critical story about Sergey Belov, editor-in-chief of Chernomorskaya Zdravnitsa (CZ), the oldest newspaper in the city of Sochi. The story was titled “Who’s the Slyest One in Sochi?” and signed by the penname “The Weiner Brothers”. Accusing Belov of all mortal sins, the authors used rather rude language and clearly supported municipal administration officials who had more than once been rightfully criticized by CZ. The editor lodged an honor-and-dignity protection claim against them.

For the following three years S. Belov and his representative Mikhail Benyash tried in vain to get the legal claim accepted by the Central District Court in Sochi. The court chairman would keep sending the claim to one and the same judge, Valery Sluka, who would turn it down each time on various pretexts. First, the judge delegated the plaintiff to a court of arbitration thinking erroneously that S. Belov intended to defend his honor as a legal entity, not an individual. Then he pretended it was not Belov but someone other who had paid the state fee. Finally, V. Sluka refused to consider the claim at all as one falling beyond his court’s jurisdiction. Each time, his decisions were canceled by a higher-standing judicial authority. At long last, A. Chernov, chairman of the regional court, frowned at the red-tapists from the district court, called a conference of eight judges and passed a ruling of July 15, 2009 censuring Judge Sluka for his repeated and wrongful decision-making and urging the district court chairman to discuss the matter at a special conference of judges.

That finally worked. On September 16, 2009, three years after the insulting publication, Judge S. Martynenko satisfied S. Belov’s claim and required the media that had circulated libelous information to publish refutations. On November 13, Bailiff K. Zhaglina instituted an executory process which, however, was interrupted by Vladimir Shapovalov, the new editor of the municipal newspaper Novosti Sochi, filing a request “to restore the term for referring to the Court of Cassation”. After more than 3 months (instead of the law-established 10-day deadline) Judge Vadim Ageyenko satisfied Shapovalov’s request and actually annulled Judge Martynenko’s decision which had already entered into full legal force. The annulment was justified by V. Shapovalov’s claim that his newspaper had been misled as to the actual term of reference to the Cassation Court.

“Although the judicial road to the restoration of honor and dignity has been rather long, no one will be able to undermine the public respect enjoyed by Chernomorskaya Zdravnitsa, its editor and its staff – not even those hiding under the assumed name of the Weiner Brothers,” Sergey Belov commented.

 
5. Republic of Karelia. Finance minister at law with two newspapers

By Anatoly Tsygankov,
GDF staff correspondent in North-Western Federal District

Karelia’s Finance Minister Sergey Mikhailov has filed with the City Court of Petrozavodsk legal claims against two republican newspapers at once – Moskovsky Komsomolets v Karelii (MKK) and Karelskaya Gubernia (KG). Both have been giving extensive coverage to the judicial process in which the minister is involved.

The conflict flared up between Mikhailov’s family and the partnership of tenants of the apartment block where the minister lives with his wife. Communal service payment arrears caused the house manager, V. Medvedev, to cut off electricity supply to Mikhailov’s apartment, a move that Mikhailov protested in court. First, the court found in Medvedev’s favor, which decision was then appealed against and canceled, with the case sent for review and Mikhailov winning it in the long run.

The media would hardly ever focus on a minor communal conflict like that if it were not between two Petrozavodsk celebrities – one of them government official Mikhailov, the other City Council deputy Medvedev. Naturally, the newspapers kept reporting on each new turn in the judicial process. Finally, they got involved in it, too – as co-defendants.

S. Mikhailov is unhappy about two passages in media reports. One is a quote from house manager Medvedev’s statement about Mikhailov having threatened and cursed him (as reported by Karelskaya Gubernia). The other is an emotional remark he himself made in a telephone comment to an MKK reporter on the switched-off power supply to his apartment: “I’ll go whack the house manager in the face!” The conversation was heard by several other journalists who were present in the office (the telephone was in the speakerphone mode), but no tape recording of the talk with the minister was made.

Mikhailov insists that those two passages are libelous and damaging to his reputation; he wants the two newspapers to refute them and pay him RUR 100,000 each in moral damage compensation. Justifying the size of the claimed amounts, Mikhailov says he suffered moral damage not only as a private person but also as a public official.

Meanwhile, after repeated abortive attempts to collect Mikhailov’s communal service arrears (about RUR 60,000), the tenants’ partnership has prepared a legal claim against the non-paying neighbor. Legal proceedings are likely to continue, with the KG and MKK staffs, who are now co-defendants in court, expected to watch the judicial developments with increased interest.


6. Vladivostok. Newspaper accused of extremism

By Anna Seleznyova,
GDF staff correspondent in Far Eastern Federal District

Commenting on a RosKomNadzor [federal agency supervising the sphere of public communications] warning issued to the newspaper Arsenyevskiye Vesti (AV), editor Irina Grebneva said: “They are picking on us and watching us closely to find any pretext whatsoever to shut down our media outlet.”

The warning came in the wake of AV’s publishing an illustration (borrowed from the website karikatura.ru) to its December 16th story about soaring communal service tariffs; which the Russian abbreviation “ЖКХ” on the illustration featured like a flag with a twisted swastika. Naturally, no one intended to glorify or deliberately disseminate the fascist symbol – but that proved enough for an opposition newspaper to be accused of extremism.

The editor has not yet received the official text of the warning issued in line with the RF Law to Combat Extremism. Speaking to the GDF correspondent, I. Grebneva said: “We did not intend, and could never possibly have intended, to glorify Nazism in our publication. The story was about abuses in the sphere of communal services, such as unjustified surcharges for hot-water supplies, and by placing that illustration we wanted to show that our communal service system is as inhuman and brutal as fascism.” The editor dismisses the accusations as irrelevant and intends to challenge the RosKomNadzor warning.



BELARUS

Police search journalist’s apartment

The BelaPAN news agency has reported that on January 13 the police searched the rented apartment of Sergey Serebro, a Vitebsk-based photo journalist and editor of the web newspaper Narodniya Naviny Vitsebska. Neither the journalist nor his wife were present during the search.

According to S. Serebro, earlier that day his wife had had a phone call from the landlady who had told her the police wanted her to open the apartment for a search – they had not said what in particular they were looking for.

It seems likely the search may have been held in connection with the “case of Sergey Kovalenko” who had hung out a white-red-white flag on the top of the New Year fir-tree in Victory Square in Vitebsk on January 7. The flag was removed only a quarter of an hour later but S. Serebro had had the time to take some photo pictures of it. He says a lady investigator from the Vitebsk Region Executive Committee called him on the phone earlier today to invite him for questioning about the flag incident but he refused to come unless he was officially summoned.

According to preliminary reports, two PCs with photo archives and a photo camera were confiscated from Serebro’s apartment.

Pictures of a New Year tree with a white-red-white flag on top have been featured, besides Serebro’s website, by a number of Belarussian and Russian media.

[Beloruskiye Novosti report, January 14]




GLASNOST DEFENSE FOUNDATION

Some statistics cited

Last week, the Glasnost Defense Foundation was referred to at least 10 times in the Internet, including at:

http://www.svobodanews.ru/archive/ru_news_zone/20100113/17/17.html?id=1928362
http://www.svobodanews.ru/content/article/1928367.html
http://www.asi.org.ru/ASI3/rws_asi.nsf/va_WebPages/52BB2A5F2A50B323C32576AA0044942ARus
http://echo.msk.ru/programs/speakrus/647623-echo/
http://www.dayudm.ru/news/2010/01/18/46685/
http://www.gazetanv.ru/archive/article/?id=6131
http://www.polit.ru/news/2010/01/15/piket.html




OUR PUBLICATIONS

1. Press Day in Russia

By Konstantin Mamedov,
editor, newspaper Velsk-Info (Arkhangelsk Region)

Why not raise a glass of champagne on a holiday, the more so one falling on the “old-style” New Year’s Day [Orthodox believers in Russia still celebrate the New Year on January 13, in line with the Julian calendar, although this country officially adopted the Gregorian calendar in 1918 – Translator.]? But then, the mood is anything but festive. Moreover, there are reasons to feel sorry for having to say farewell to what has been left of the former glasnost and freedom of expression…

Today, authorities no longer need to impose censorship, or control the journalists, or restrict the choices of information the readers/viewers/listeners make. We have already reached a level of servility where journalists cringe before the powerful of their own free will and their audiences no longer ask for anything more. The demand for free expression has been shrinking at a catastrophically fast pace. People have already been taught to choose cheap entertainments, sleazy pop culture, tawdry glossy magazines and other philistine pseudo-values. As one political writer recently put it, “Russia seems to be in a dead faint.” Instead of upholding honor, dignity and full justice, people have learned the basics of consumerism, self-interest, careerism and timeserving. In this kind of public atmosphere, journalism has given way to the provision of reporting services for those at the helm and entertainment services for those a step lower…

As for the region of Arkhangelsk, we lost the last regional, more or less independent, newspaper – Moskovsky Komsomolets v Arkhangelske – last year. Together with another critically-minded one, Pravda Severa, it was bought by entities deemed to be close to the United Russia Party. Ilya Azovsky’s Pravda Severo-Zapada, while taking the liberty of publishing stories with broad public repercussions from time to time, is clearly inconsistent and politically committed. The release of Novy Region has been suspended. The sole really independent opposition newspaper that continues to be issued in Arkhangelsk Region is Velsk-Info.

Besides, there are five regional websites I would very much recommend to our readers who are interested in the actual developments in and outside Arkhangelsk: http://pozornistolb.okis.ru/ , http://kochegar.com/, http://alexander.grevtsov.ru/, http://arhsvoboda.ucoz.ru/ and http://www.rusnord.ru/.

A merry Press Day to all!

For the full text of the publication, see http://www.gdf.ru/lenta/item/1/692 


2. Festival with a taste of bitterness

By Olga Vassilyeva,
GDF staff correspondent in Far Eastern Federal District

On Russian Press Day’s eve, the presidium of the Sakhalin branch of the Russian Journalists’ Union summed up the results of the Anton Chekhov Creative Competition which has been held annually for 45 years now and is deemed to be the most prestigious journalistic contest on Sakhalin Island – a dreamlike event for any reporter not only because of the monetary award accompanying the winner’s diploma but also because of the high level of public recognition going with it. In the past, the results of the Chekhov Competition were announced by all the media; the laureates were honored and interviewed in the presence of VIP guests; stories in defense of the journalistic community were valued especially highly. The Jury would sit for up to three days to select the best five or six opuses in different nominations from several hundred newspaper clippings, CDs and recorded video and TV cassettes contributed by the contestants.

Over the past 45 years, there have been attempts to organize alternative competitions, like that for the Media Union Award, the Governor’s Prize, and various other, intra-industry, awards. Although they attached money checks weighing much more than the Chekhov Competition’s, the latter remained the best and most prestigious. For any journalist, colleagues’ recognition matters a lot more because it is much more difficult to earn than the readers’ or viewers’ appreciation.

This year’s situation was strikingly different.

Instead of several hundred contributions, only some twenty or so lay on the Jury table. In the past, many of those would never even have been discussed: although done quite professionally, they were nothing-out-of-the-ordinary stories, with not a single report from the districts. In Sakhalin Region, there are eleven districts, each with a couple of newspapers and a TV network of its own… It was not without difficulty that someone was found to fill the “Reportage” nomination – and no one at all for the “Young Talent” nomination.

Unbelievable: the Jury sat for one hour only. An unseen thing happened: the crowd left the restaurant just minutes after the handing of awards – and this despite the good food (thanks our sponsors) and live music. In olden days, people would stay until midnight – they so much liked to mix and talk! Today, journalists are unwilling to communicate, as if knowing in advance who would say what. Indeed, over the last three years alone, two opposition newspapers in the region have been closed and a third one changed its editorial policy. In late December the regional supplement to the federal weekly Argumenty I Fakty was scrapped, and the supplement to Komsomolskaya Pravda changed drastically, now that its content is determined by a news agency belonging to the regional administration. When journalists receive information from the same sources and are paid by the same owners, they are of zero interest to one another.

Lina Avericheva, former chair of the regional branch of the RF Journalists’ Union and a member of the presidium:
- I am really shocked. I even want to resign as a presidium member. All I want to say is journalism is dead. The Chekhov Competition has gone through different periods: in the 1990s, for example, we could not find sponsors to pay the awards. But the quality of journalism was superior at the time! We Jury members shouted ourselves coarse trying to persuade one another why one brilliant report was better than another, almost equally brilliant. We rushed to defend each other, we looked forward to our professional holiday, we longed to hear each other’s opinion! Today, the competition is marked by an exceptionally low level of professionalism which I think is rooted in the journalists’ desire to pursue their selfish financial interests.

Lyubov Kasyan, incumbent Union chair:
- I wish I knew how other local Union branches live and work and fight for their survival… Regrettably, over the three years of my tenure the Journalists’ Union has never once displayed any interest in our life, and never once invited Sakhalin journalists to a seminar, a meeting or a conference – only to this notorious “Press Ball”, and even that on the condition that we pay for our railroad and entrance tickets, and our hotel accommodation from our own pockets…




OUR PARTNERS

1. Journalists in Bryansk help raise money for disabled kid


The parents of Georgy Chepinsky have been offered RUR 47,000, an unthinkable sum for a low-income family, to buy their son a neuro-orthopedic pressurized air suit – a real “must” for anyone suffering from cerebral palsy.

Georgy spent all the 14 years of his life in a wheelchair. When journalists learned about his family’s problems, they announced a special charity action in the newspaper Desnitsa and collected with the help of local residents the amount of money needed for the purchase of the air suit. On January 4 the boy made, although with difficulty, the first few independent steps in his life. The air suit designers guarantee that with time Georgy will learn to control his body and partially service his own self. Arm movements and walking will contribute to brain development, a vitally important thing for cerebral palsy patients. As a result, the boy will find it easier to speak and the people around – to understand him.

Provintsiya Publishers’ journalists regularly organize actions in support of low-income families. They have already learned that there are many people of ready sympathy in this country. Asked by our reporters why they help others, most action participants say one and the same thing: “Because we feel we must.”

[Provintsiya Publishers’ press service]


2. Winners of journalistic competition honored in Chita

The winners of the 4th regional competition of journalists writing about human rights, “The Sharp Pens of the Trans-Baikal Territory-2009” were honored at a ceremony in Chita on January 13.

Nikolai Chernyayev, editor of the newspaper Chitinskoye Obozreniye, received a diploma in the nomination “Influential Journalism”. His article “The Land of Devastation” reminded everyone how our rulers should react to media criticism. Regional administration officials were compelled to publicly apologize and cancel the exorbitant land rent tariffs that might lead many businessmen in the region to bankruptcy. Journalist Andrei Kopteyev of the newspaper Extra won in the “Journalistic Investigation” nomination, having written a series of articles about a lady official said to be close to the Trans-Baikal governor, who had stolen a pensioner’s apartment and deceived the state, for which evil practices she was then put on trial. In the view of Jury members, that happened solely because of media and society’s focus on that story. Ksenia Perminova of the newspaper Komsomolskaya Pravda-Chita got a diploma in the “Human Rights Journalism” nomination for a series of stories about regional human rights defenders. The award in the “Independent Journalism” nomination went to Yekaterina Shaitanova, editor of the Chita.ru news agency, for her bold and interesting reports on socially important events in the region.

All the winners received their diplomas together with monetary awards.




DIGEST MAIL

On January 13, the Glasnost Defense Foundation received the following message from T. Sukhoruchenko, editor-in-chief of the newspaper Kotovsky Vestnik (Volgograd Region) and director of the municipal enterprise of the same name:

“On December 31, 2009, an administration-appointed commission unlawfully shut down and sealed off all the offices of Kotovsky Vestnik in the town of Kotovo and, in the absence of the Rules of Conducting Service Inspections (approved by Kotovo Mayor A. N. Yakovenko) compiled an inspection protocol containing some legally unjustified conclusions.

“Specifically, the protocol says that surplus payments to employees stepping in to work instead of their temporarily absent colleagues should have been made in line with the USSR State Employment Committee (30) and Central Trade Union Committee (39) Recommendations of December 12, 1965, providing for the payment of the difference in salaries.

“However, in line with Article 423 of the RF Labor Code, ‘any legal acts of the former Soviet Union still in effect in the Russian Federation within the legal framework prescribed by the RF Constitution and RSFSR Supreme Council Decision No. 2014-1 of December 12, 1991, ‘On Ratifying the Agreement on the Establishment of the Commonwealth of Independent States,’ shall be applicable insofar as they are consistent with this Code’s provisions.’

“In contrast to the above-mentioned Recommendations, Article 151 of the RF Labor Code regulates surplus payments to temporary acting workers differently: ‘The amount of surplus payments shall be agreed upon by the work agreement signatories with due regard for the content and/or volume of additional work done.’

“Thus, those Recommendations are at odds with effective employment legislation. Disregarding this fact, Commission members wrongfully calculated the amount of extra pay to be returned. That served as a pretext for withholding salary payments to the employees for December 2009. According to the town mayor, any further payments will only be made if the editor returns the ‘overpaid’ sums.

“Besides, the Commission ordered, in excess of its authority, the director’s dismissal as a disciplinary measure – in violation of Article 192 of the RF Labor Code which stipulates that any disciplinary action in respect of an employee can only be taken by his/her employer, which the Commission is not.

“I see the above-described inspection as part of a deliberate action aimed at having our media outlet closed and the editor-in-chief dismissed.

“In view of all of the above, I hereby ask you to have the controversial protocol assessed by experts in terms of the legitimacy of both the inspection and the Commission with its findings. The town administration needs to be ordered to pay the newspaper staffers their salaries for December 2009, and the guilty parties need to be brought to justice.”


Besides the GDF, copies of T. Sukhoruchenko’s message were sent to the Volgograd Region Prosecutor’s Office, the regional administration’s Press and Information Committee, the Volgograd branch of RosKomNadzor, the regional administration’s Labor and Employment Committee, the Volgograd branch of the State Employment Inspectorate, the Kotovsky District Prosecutor’s Office, and the head of Kotovo town administration (for information).




This Digest has been prepared by the Glasnost Defense Foundation (GDF), http://www.gdf.ru.

We appreciate the support of the John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation.
Digest released once a week, on Mondays, since August 11, 2000.
Distributed by e-mail to 1,600 subscribers in and outside Russia.

Editor-in-chief: Alexei Simonov

Editorial board: Boris Timoshenko – Monitoring Service chief, Pyotr Polonitsky – head of GDF regional network, Svetlana Zemskova – lawyer, Vsevolod Shelkhovskoy – translator, Alexander Efremov – web administrator in charge of Digest distribution.


We would appreciate reference to our organization in the event of any Digest-sourced information or other materials being used.

Contacts: Glasnost Defense Foundation, 4, Zubovsky Boulevard, Office 432, 119992 Moscow, Russia.
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Архив
ФЗГ продолжает бороться за свое честное имя. Пройдя все необходимые инстанции отечественного правосудия, Фонд обратился в Европейский суд. Для обращения понадобилось вкратце оценить все, что Фонд сделал за 25 лет своего существования. Вот что у нас получилось:
Полезная деятельность Фонда защиты гласности за 25 лет его жизни